December 14, 2019

Sutherlin Mansion Gingerbread House

BUILDING

Edible Architecture: A Collaborative Workshop

20 tickets available for each session

 

Building Has Never Been So Delicious

Building Family togetherness with a little sweetness in the mortar and sugar in the bricks!!!

No Licking & No Fun (Just Kidding)

 

(DMFAH also has an audio tour for those who would like to tour the Danville Museum BEFORE you start the sticky process of building your gingerbread house)

 

Date: Saturday December 14

Time: Two Sessions

11am – 1pm

2pm – 4pm

Where: Museum Auditorium

Ticket Price: $15.00 Adult + child ($ 10 for Museum Members)

$5.00 for each extra Child (3- 11yrs)

SCAN QR CODE WITH YOUR PHONE CAMERA TO ORDER YOUR TICKETS OR CLICK THE LINK BELOW!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sutherlin-mansion-gingerbread-house-building-tickets-80289326537

 

 

All children need to be accompanied by an adult, and the Gingerbread house building can be a collaborative effort (Or not. Sometimes a master builder just needs a little support for great creative projects). Each ticket will give you a plate with a graham cracker house that needs decorating. All tables will have green and white icing (for mortar and snow and trees) and miscellaneous holiday candy will be available to decorate. All proceeds will go toward the See and Do Children’s Room and education programming.

 

Gingerbread House Building Activity will take place in the Children’s See and Do Room at the Danville Museum of Fine Art and History, 975 Main Street, Danville, VA 24541

 

About:  Building Family togetherness with a little sweetness in the mortar and sugar in the bricks!!! No Licking & No Fun (Just Kidding)

The Sutherlin Mansion offers family fun over the holidays, which might just be finger licking good. Join us in constructing gingerbread houses that can become great holiday decorations. Transport yourself and family members to a place and time when architecture knows no rules. Use your imagination to conjure up a holiday fantasy house, good enough to eat!  With this beautiful gingerbread house, you can leave your cares behind and enjoy the Sutherlin Mansion’s historical setting in a kid-friendly way. Give yourself the time to indulge in sticky fun and let us clean up the kitchen!!! Great conversations with your young builders can be had while nibbling on sweet treats and sipping hot chocolate.  This is the perfect mother-child/ Grandparent-grand child/ Big Brother and Sister and young sibling event for the busy holiday season.

 

Tables will be set with holiday candy offering fun and sweetness to make the holidays less stressful.

 

The History behind Gingerbread Houses

Tori Avey states in her food blog for PBS that Gingerbread arrived in the New World with English colonists. She says the cookies were sometimes used to sway Virginia voters to favor one candidate over another. The first American cookbook, American Cookery by Amelia Simmons, has recipes for three types of gingerbread including the soft variety baked in loaves:

Soft gingerbread to be baked in pans.

No. 2. Rub three pounds of sugar, two pounds of butter, into four pounds of flour, add 20 eggs, 4 ounces ginger, 4 spoons rosewater, bake as No. 1.

This softer version of gingerbread was more common in America. George Washington’s mother, Mary Ball Washington, served her recipe for gingerbread to the Marquis de Lafayette when he visited her Fredericksburg, Virginia home. Since then it was known as Gingerbread Lafayette. 

Gingerbread houses originated in Germany during the 16th century. The elaborate cookie-walled houses, decorated with foil in addition to gold leaf, became associated with Christmas tradition. Their popularity rose when the Brothers Grimm wrote the story of Hansel and Gretel, in which the main characters stumble upon a house made entirely of treats deep in the forest. It is unclear whether or not gingerbread houses were a result of the popular fairy tale, or vice versa.

 

Tori Avey is a food writer, recipe developer, and the creator of ToriAvey.com. She explores the story behind the food – why we eat what we eat, how the foods of different cultures have evolved, and how yesterday’s food can inspire us in the kitchen today. http://www.pbs.org/food/the-history-kitchen/history-gingerbread/

 

 So if you are older, or quite young. This is an event for you where all can have fun. Rejuvenate and relax during the busy holiday season.